Biodesulfurization of dibenzthiophene and petroleum by Rhodococcus erythropolis

  • Michelle Demata Institute of Chemistry & Natural Sciences Research Institute, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
  • Nesha May Andoy Institute of Chemistry, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
  • Auxilia Siringan Natural Sciences Research Institute, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
  • James Villanueva Institute of Chemistry & Natural Sciences Research Institute, University of the Philippines, Quezon City
Keywords: acid rain, petroleum, biodesulfurization, dibenzothiophene, anionic detergent

Abstract

The removal of sulfur from petroleum by microorganisms has emerged as one of the most promising alternatives to hydrodesulfurization (HDS). The use of microorganisms offers the advantages of higher specificity towards organic sulfur, low cost and milder operating conditions. In this study, the biodesulfurization activity of seven bacterial strains was investigated using dibenzothiophene (DBT) as substrate. DBT is a compound, often found in petroleum, which resists hydrodesulfurization. Combinations of some of these bacteria were also examined for their biodesulfurization activity. Degradation products were detected using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. Of the seven strains tested, Rhodococcus erythropolis Q1a-22 exhibited the greatest biodesulfurization activity, converting DBT to 1-hydroxybiphenyl (1-HBP). The effect of two nonionic surfactants, Triton X-100 and Tween 80, was also investigated. Unlike Triton X-100, Tween 80 did not show toxicity towards R. erythropolis Q a-22. Maximum degree of biodesulfurization was observed at the critical micelle concentration of this surfactant. R. erythropolis Q1a-22 was also found to desulfurize petroleum.
Published
2003-12-01
How to Cite
Demata, M., Andoy, N. M., Siringan, A., & Villanueva, J. (2003). Biodesulfurization of dibenzthiophene and petroleum by Rhodococcus erythropolis. KIMIKA, 19(2), 51-58. https://doi.org/10.26534/kimika.v19i2.51-58
Section
Research Articles